Why do Muslims smell of curry?

One of my grandmother’s biggest complaints about immigrants, aside from their big noses and swarthy skin, was their smell.

Continue reading “Why do Muslims smell of curry?”

“Every Thing Is Haram!” (Kullu Shay Haram) – by Andrew Ramsey

Most converts have encountered someone like this along the way…

THE REVERT HUB

Kullu shay haram!

What would a convert’s experience be without having encountered the ‘haram police’?

Let me set the scene:

You are not even a year past your shahadah. You walk into a masjid wearing the latest jeans, a hooded top and sporting a flat top hair cut with a fade. So far so good. You sit down minding your own business, taking in the atmosphere of your new worshipping grounds…then it happens!

halalharam-crop

A brother approaches. Little to your knowledge he’s been meaning to approach you ever since you entered (yeah, he was watching for that long). He’s slim, tall and wearing a long white thawb with a Chinese collar.  You greet him with salam. He salams you back. He proceeds to sit by you with his legs crossed.  Here come the initial superficial questions: your name, where you’re from etc. You know, the small talk that sets up for…

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My wife thinks I’m a terrorist – I think it’s time I told her the truth

In the last few weeks I have been staying up late at the computer, my phone has been buzzing at all times of the day and night, and I have been reading Qu’ran more than usual.

Continue reading “My wife thinks I’m a terrorist – I think it’s time I told her the truth”

No alcohol safe to drink, global study confirms – BBC News

Muslims everywhere are saying “I told you so” this morning. Continue reading “No alcohol safe to drink, global study confirms – BBC News”

Muslims can drink alcohol, but they should not

I think I might have found a loophole

Everyone it seems, whether Muslim or not, has their own ideas about the laws of Islam. But one of the things that everyone knows is that Muslims can’t drink alcohol, right?

Well, technically that’s not true.

A Muslim can drink if they want to.

In fact, Muslims always have a choice in everything that they do whether praying, fasting, or eating pork.

Muslims can even murder if they like.

Say that again?

Following Islam does not stop a person doing anything, in exactly the same way that British law does not physically prevent crime. Rape, robbery and fraud happens every day in this country even though they are all illegal.

The point of Islam, like any legal system, is to modify human behavior in order to prevent harm, whether to the individual or others.

One beer won’t hurt?

It’s true that alcohol in small quantities causes minimal harm to the human body. But it is also true that alcohol causes enormous harm in our society.

Think about the street fights, car accidents, and vandalism that happen as a direct result of alcohol. Think about the homelessness, the marriage breakdowns, the domestic violence, and the depression caused by alcohol. Think about all the people, as you read this, who are dying, yellow and bloated, because of alcohol-induced liver failure.

Alcohol costs Britain billions of pounds each year, and infinitely more in human suffering.

So whilst Muslims can drink alcohol if they wish, they should understand why Islam teaches them that they should not.

Doctors Make The Worst Patients

That is not because we worry about the rare diseases we learned at medical school (although this is a well-known problem seen in medical students), but because we don’t worry enough.

As doctors we see thousands of patients with tens of thousands of symptoms, many of which will not have an identifiable cause despite thorough investigation. We call these ‘medically unexplained symptoms’. They don’t worry us too much – we know there is no serious underlying cause, and we know they will not get any worse or threaten our patients’ lives.

So rather than worry that our symptoms are caused by cancer, like many of our patients (especially the ones who check Google before coming to see us), doctors have a tendency to think that our own symptoms will be nothing serious. There are countless stories of doctors who have put off going to see their own GP until it was almost too late.

One of my clinical supervisors had pain in his chest for months. It was not bad enough for him to think it was a heart attack, so he just put it down to stress, or maybe a bit of heartburn. Eventually after the pain worsened and he started to feel feverish, he went off to see his own GP and was diagnosed with pericarditis – inflammation of the sac that surrounds the heart. He was off work for two months after that.

My advice to everyone is to see your GP as soon as possible if any symptom is something which you notice regularly and it bothers you. Even if it doesn’t bother you but it just doesn’t seem quite normal, I would much rather see you early on and tell you that it is nothing serious, than be faced with something that is already well developed and therefore much harder to treat.